I have decided to get away from all this technology discussion and dust off the archives from 11 years ago in the interest of getting back to basics. My longtime readers remember about blocking and tackling, Vince Lomabardi taught us what that meant. Making more bottom line profit is about the basics.

The landscape for food industry traceability changes as quickly as the technology industry, and that technology is eroding the barrier between the haves and the have-nots.  Financial bandwidth and size are now secondary to a company mentality that embraces change.  This week let's see how the have-nots can thrive in the new environment and implement recall systems that were previously out of reach to meet and exceed the requirements of the USDA, FDA, and the Food Safety Modernization Act.

Two weeks ago we discussed IBM Food Trust, block-chain technology to help the food industry with Traceability.  On Monday IBM announced a $33 Billion deal to buy Red Hat, the operating system on which our Food Connex systems run.  Part of my job is to keep my audience abreast of these issues, even if you don't usually focus on these topics.  Today we'll look at how 'open-source' technology can keep money in your pocket.

Transformation and disruption was a topic in an article in the Sunday Philadelphia Inquirer. I read about the demise of Sears & Roebuck titled The Big Stumble. They believed they had no competitors. The New York Times dubbed them "The Amazon of the gilded age." Those of us in the baby boom generation remember Sears.  As a young boy I remember thumbing through the catalog, dreaming of what I could buy if I had the money.

We have been talking with our Protein customers and readers about recalls for decades, at least 60 issues by my count. As most of our meat, 80%, comes from 4 major suppliers the constant preaching of tracking your meat has continued to land on deaf ears.

One year ago we discussed How Intelligent Are You and the use of spreadsheets to run your business. The use of Excel is still a major part of everyday business for a lot of my customers and prospects. Most owners don’t realize how many answers they receive from their employees are sourced from Excel. Today we'll discuss how the new breed of BI (Business Intelligence) makes you more effective at running your business.

One of the best sources for new customers is referrals from existing customers, but if you have fallen out of the habit of asking it can feel awkward to start again.  This week we discuss some of the techniques to get you back on track.

We have spent a lot of energy over the years talking about transformation and taking advantage of opportunities. In February we touched on movement in the Plant-based Protein market. Well time to get the latest update on the financial side of that business and how it is penetrating the current businesses you sell to.

In my post-holiday business reading I caught some information about the new Industrial revolution.  The upcoming revolution will remake our economy in ways more transformational than the Internet did back in the 90’s. We will look at some of those factors and how they will affect us in the Food Community.

A prospect recently challenged me to show a return on investment of two to two and a half years. For the majority of my career a 'good' return on investment (ROI) was two years, a great return was one year, and an unbelievable return was six months.  Today with our SaaS offering we're seeing customers regularly returning on their investment in four to five months, so it may be time to revisit how we think about ROI calculations.

Issue 643 - Blocking and Tackling Revisited

I have decided to get away from all this technology discussion and dust off the archives from 11 years ago in the interest of getting back to basics. My longtime readers remember about blocking and tackling, Vince Lomabardi taught us what that meant. Making more bottom line profit is about the basics.

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